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Sequestration Results in Suspension of Military Tuition Assistance Programs

March 11, 2013

Military Tuition Assistance Program

Education Department Releases Guidance on How Cuts Will Affect Financial Aid Programs

​The Army and Marine Corps have announced they are suspending new enrollments in their Tuition Assistance (TA) programs due to sequestration, the massive cuts to federal discretionary spending that took effect March 1.

The TA programs provide up to $4,500 per fiscal year for active-duty troops who are attending high school completion courses and certificate programs, or are working toward college degrees. The change will not affect service members who currently receive tuition assistance.

The Navy and Air Force have not yet made public plans to follow suit, although Inside Higher Ed reports that they are considering similar cuts. (UPDATE: As of March 12, the Coast Guard and Air Force have now suspended their TA programs.)

In other sequestration news, the Education Department issued guidance last week on what the automatic budget cuts would mean for federal financial aid programs. Funding will be reduced for the Federal Work-Study Program and for the Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Program beginning in the fall if sequestration remains in effect.

On the research side, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) predicts some $1.6 billion in cuts, much of which will come from university grant-funded research. However, NIH has not yet said which grants will be trimmed or by how much.

Also see:

ACE Issues Paper on Higher Education Under Sequestration

Colleges Hold Out Hope of Avoiding Steep Cuts in Funds
The Chronicle of Higher Education (sub. req.)

Sequestration Complicates College Aid Notices
USA Today

Explore the Sequester’s Effects on Higher Education Funding
U.S. News & World Report

Sequestration Means Fewer Classes, Faculty at Tribal Schools
Diverse: Issues In Higher Education 

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