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Comments to the FCC on Proposed Reform of the USF Contribution Methodology

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Comments to the FCC on Proposed Reform of the USF Contribution Methodology

August 06, 2012

Comments to the Federal Communications Commission on the proposed reform of the Universal Service Fund contribution methodology. The groups signing the comments—including ACE—believe that basing USF contributions on telephone numbers, unrelated to network usage, would impose a burden on low-volume users and that private networks, such as those operated by colleges and universities, should not be subject to USF fees.

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